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Australia

Corporate Climate Policy Engagement

The Largest Corporates in Australia Compared on Climate Lobbying

The diagram below charts the Total Score and global Engagement Intensity for the 50 companies operating in Australia that are most significant to climate change (please see FAQs for how these companies were chosen). The higher the Total Score, the more the company lobbies to support Paris-Aligned climate policy. The Total Score expresses how supportive or obstructive the company is towards climate policy aligned with the Paris Agreement, incorporating an analysis of its trade association links. The Engagement Intensity (0-100) expresses the intensity of this activity, whether positive or negative. This diagram shows the global Engagement Intensity rather than how companies are lobbying in Australia specifically, which is shown in the second diagram.

InfluenceMap maintains the world’s leading database of corporate and industry association lobbying of climate policy around the globe, covering around 300 companies and 150 industry groups globally. Full details of what our metrics mean are contained within the info icons. A full explanation of our methodology can be found here.

The Australian Lobbying Landscape

The above diagram shows the global Engagement Intensities for each company. In order to determine which companies are the most engaged within Australia, InfluenceMap analyzed how many Australian-specific engagements each company had. The diagram below shows the top 15 companies most engaged with Australian climate policy, and which sector they belong to.

Top 15 companies engaged on climate change and climate policy in Australia since 2018

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Company Listings

Below is a ranking table with the 50 companies included in this research. A summary profile and full access to the data underlying the assessments can be accessed via the links in the table

InfluenceMap Performance Band
Organization
Sector
Headquartered
C-
Ampol Limited (formerly Caltex Australia) Energy Australia
D
Toyota Motor Automobiles Japan
D-
Glencore International Metals & Mining Switzerland
F
Peabody Metals & Mining United States
C+
Westpac Banking Corporation Financials Australia
D+
Coles Group Consumer Staples Australia
F
Sunset Power International (Delta Electricity) Utilities Australia
n/a
AMP Financials Australia
C
Suncorp Financials Australia
C
Insurance Australia Group Financials Australia
C-
Holcim Construction Materials Switzerland
C
Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Financials Australia
C-
BP Energy United Kingdom
B-
National Australia Bank Financials Australia
B
Apple Information Technology United States
E+
Chevron Energy United States
C+
Commonwealth Bank of Australia Financials Australia
n/a
Metcash Consumer Staples Australia
C
Macquarie Group Financials Australia
D
South32 Metals & Mining Australia
D
Anglo American Metals & Mining United Kingdom
D-
Santos Energy Australia
D+
BHP Metals & Mining Australia
E+
Yancoal Metals & Mining Australia
E-
Whitehaven Coal Metals & Mining Australia
D
Woodside Energy Australia
D-
ExxonMobil Energy United States
C+
AGL Australia Utilities Australia
C-
Origin Energy Energy Australia
D
Rio Tinto Group Metals & Mining United Kingdom
C-
Wesfarmers Retailing Australia
C-
Woolworths Ltd Consumer Staples Australia
C-
Bluescope Steel Metals & Mining Australia
C-
Qantas Airways Transportation Australia
C
Telstra Telecommunications Australia
D-
ConocoPhillips Energy United States
C-
Shell Energy United Kingdom
E+
Virgin Australia Transportation Australia
D-
Banpu Energy Thailand
C-
Fortescue Metals Group Metals & Mining Australia
D+
Adbri (Adelaide Brighton) Construction Materials Australia
D+
Boral Limited Construction Materials Australia
C-
Lendlease Construction Materials Oceania
n/a
Singapore Telecommunications Limited (Singtel) Telecommunications Singapore
E+
Alinta Energy Energy Australia
D+
Orica Industrials Australia
D
Viva Energy Energy Oceania
D+
Mitsubishi Corporation Industrials Japan
D
Alcoa Metals & Mining United States
D+
EnergyAustralia Energy Australia