VIC Renewable Energy Target (2016)

Policy Description

The Victoria Renewable Energy Target (VRET) was announced in 2016. It sets a target to source 25% of Victoria’s electricity from renewable sources by 2020 and 40% by 2025.

InfluenceMap Query

Renewable Energy

Policy Status

Active

Lobbying Overview

  • The evidence collected on corporate and industry lobbying on the VRET from 2016-19 indicates that the majority of corporate influence on the policy has been unsupportive or oppositional.
  • Companies such as Origin Energy and Viva Energy, as well as industry groups including Ai Group, Australian Energy Council and Business Council of Australia, have opposed the VRET or lobbied to weaken the target. These entities emphasized the risk of increased energy prices, the need for a technology-neutral approach, and/or the need to avoid duplication with the (less ambitious) federal Renewable Energy Target.
  • Clean Energy Council appeared to actively support the VRET in 2017-18.

Evidence Profile

99117

Policy Progress

Despite the negative corporate and industry lobbying on the VRET in 2016-19, the Victorian Government increased the target from 25 to 50% by 2030 under the Renewable Energy (Jobs and Investment) Act 2017, enacted in 2020.

Entities Engaged on Policy

The table below lists the entities tracked by InfluenceMap which have publicly engaged with the policy. InfluenceMap tracks around 300 companies and 150 industry associations globally. Each entity links back to the entities’ full InfluenceMap profile, where the evidence of its engagement can be found.

InfluenceMap Performance Band
Organization
Sector
Headquartered
A-
Clean Energy Council Energy Australia
C
Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) All Sectors Australia
D
Business Council of Australia All Sectors Australia
E
Australian Chamber of Commerce & Industry All Sectors Australia
C
Australian Energy Council Energy Australia
C-
Origin Energy Energy Australia
D
Viva Energy Energy Oceania
F
Sunset Power International (Delta Electricity) Utilities Australia